Pope Francis: Learn how to beg.

Pope Francis waves to the crowd during "Encounter with the Youth" at the University of Santo Tomas.

Pope Francis waves to the crowd during “Encounter with the Youth” at the University of Santo Tomas. Photo courtesy of Edwin Bacasmas, Inquirer.net

“You still lack one thing. Become a beggar. This is what you still lack. Learn how to beg.”

After hearing much of the cliché that to give is better than to receive, here is now Pope Francis, teaching people to beg, in his message delivered at the University of Santo Tomas on January 18, during his encounter with the youth.

“This isn’t easy to understand. To learn how to beg. To learn how to receive with humility. To learn to be evangelized by the poor, by those we help, the sick, the orphans. They have so much to give us.” This part of his message was addressed to the questions of Rikki Macolor: How can young people be successful without being blinded by worldly temptations? How can the young people of today become true agents of mercy and compassion? Macolor is an engineer who came up with a solar night light in 2013 which was used to help the people in Visayas, after being hit by typhoon Haiyan. He was tasked to deliver a speech to Pope Francis along with other few young individuals during the Papal Visit at UST.

Pope Francis emphasized on the value of humility and that everyone must learn not only to give but also to receive. “Have I learned how to beg? Or am I self-sufficient? Do I think I need nothing? Do you know you too are poor? Do you know your own poverty and your need to receive? Do you let yourselves be evangelized by those you serve? This is what helps you mature in your commitment to give to others. Learn how to open your hand from your very own poverty,” he said. With a sense of humour, Macolor later on asked Pope Francis, “Can I beg for a selfie?” which request was willingly granted by the latter. The message was originally delivered in Spanish by the Pope and was translated to English by Msgr. Mark Gerard Miles.

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